Tagged: Todd Coffey

Milwaukee Brewers Uniform Number History: #60

Wondering who wore a certain uniform number all-time for the Milwaukee Brewers?

The Brewer Nation has got you covered. If you found this list on its own, head back here for the full repository after checking out this one.

#60

Todd Coffey (’08-’10)
Wily Peralta (’12-’13)
Matt Clark (’14)

Brewers By The (Jersey) Numbers: #60 – Todd Coffey

By: Big Rygg

First, a quick introduction to what you’re about to see the first installment of.

In an effort to focus a bit more on the individual in a team game that consists of countless individual battles throughout, the Brewer Nation presents “Brewers By The (Jersey) Numbers: A Look at the Potential 2010 Beer Makers”, which is a countdown of sorts.

When the calendar days reads such that we are a number of days away from Opening Day that corresponds with the jersey number of a player that has a realistic shot at making the 2010 25-man roster, I will profile that player in both a review of his 2009 and a preview of what can be looked forward to in 2010.

Let me put it to you this way by offering an example. April 5th is Opening Day for the Brewers. —> February 4th is 60 days away from April 5th. —> Todd Coffey wears jersey number 60. —> I profile Todd Coffey on February 4th.

Make sense? Good.

So, let’s get going with the first installment.

Justin Todd Coffey is a right-handed relief pitcher who was acquired by the Milwaukee Brewers as a waiver-wire claim in September of 2008 from the Cincinnati Reds.

He sprinted his way into the hearts of Brewers fans (figuratively and literally) by shutting down opponent after opponent as the Crew approached the playoffs after each sprint in from the bullpen regardless of which manager was calling his number 60.

In 2008, Coffey threw in nine games winning one. He posted an ERA of 0.00 and a WHIP of 1.091. He finished three games during that stretch and, like I said, was a key piece of getting Milwaukee to the post-season for the first time since 1982.

That initial success led directly in 2009 where Coffey began the season with seven more outings of scoreless relief work. It wasn’t until April 22nd against the Mets that Coffey surrendered his first run. He still even managed to record the save in that game, so it’s not like it was a total loss.

Coffey led the team in appearances bit last year with 78. While left-handed specialist Mitch Stetter was second with 71, Coffey threw 83.2 innings to Stetter’s 45.0.

Coffey was a textbook workhorse and was inarguably the 2nd most important piece of the bullpen next to the man he was setting up for, Trevor Hoffman. Coffey’s 2.90 ERA, 1.159 WHIP and 3.10 K/BB ratio all illustrate his season-long effectiveness.

Part of Coffey’s resurgence since joining the Brewers in 2008 can be linked to an increase in velocity. His strikeout rate (7.0 K/9) and walk rate (2.3 BB/9) were both the second-best of his five-year career.

As for what to look forward to in 2010? I would expect more of the same general neighborhood in statistical measurables. However I expect a slight drop off overall mostly because he pitched so much in 2009.

Coffey threw 78.0 innings in 81 games in 2006 posting a 3.58 ERA. The following season, after having throw so much, his ERA ballooned to 5.82 and his peripherals suffered as well. He only appeared in 58 games in 2007 as well.

The 2010 chapter of Todd “Hot” Coffey career will be inked by his performance with a co-authoring by how his arm recovered this winter.

Look for Coffey to be back setting up Hoffman in the 8th inning, bridging the hopefully much shorter gap between starter and closer this year.

An ERA in the low 3.00s will suit me just fine so long as his strikeout rate stays good and his walk rate doesn’t get much worse at all.

I expect big things from the man who fires up the crowd with his all out effort both on the mound and in getting to it.

All- Decade Roster

By: Big Rygg

Here is my 25-man roster (complete with starters, batting order, rotation and bullpen assignments). We will be recording a podcast in the semi-near future to no doubt dissect this (and surely Cary will disagree with a few choices).

This roster was constructed with an eye on best players at positions, but also with an eye on making what could be a legitimate 25-man roster with capable bench players and not all closers in the bullpen, etc.

First will be the roster listed alphabetically by position with starters marked with an asterisk.

SP (5) – Jeff D’Amico, Doug Davis, Yovani Gallardo, CC Sabathia, Ben Sheets
RP (7) – Todd Coffey, Francisco Cordero, Chad Fox, Trevor Hoffman, Curt Leskanic, Brian Shouse, Bob Wickman
C (2) – Henry Blanco, Damian Miller*
INF (6) – Ryan Braun*, Russell Branyan, Craig Counsell, Prince Fielder*, Bill Hall*, Jose Hernandez*
OF (5) – Corey Hart, Geoff Jenkins*, Gabe Kapler, Carlos Lee*, Scott Podsednik*

My rotation shakes out as follows:

1 – Ben Sheets (as a nod to his longevity with the team)
2 – CC Sabathia (he was that dominant in his short stint)
3 – Yovani Gallardo (future ace would make an amazing #3 on this team)
4 – Doug Davis (long tenure, LHP, consistent numbers)
5 – Jeff D’Amico (very solid statistics despite only 33 starts with the Brewers)

The bullpen stacks up like this:

Closer – Trevor Hoffman (yes, only one season but an amazing season as closer)
Set up – Francisco Cordero (flame-thrower, closing experience in the 8th inning)
LOOGy – Brian Shouse (of top three including Mitch Stetter and Ray King, Shouse was best and most consistent)
Others in the bullpen would share back-up 8th inning and the short work

And for my batting order…

CF – Scott Podsednik
SS – Jose Hernandez
3B – Ryan Braun
1B – Prince Fielder
LF – Carlos Lee
RF – Geoff Jenkins
2B – Bill Hall
C – Damian Miller
PITCHER

I am more than happy to explain my selections for this roster and I will…on the podcast. Be sure to download it when you see the post telling you that it’s there.

Happy New Year. Happy New Decade.

How about a couple or several division championships this decade?

Well I’m on my Way…

By: Big Rygg

So have we finally seen enough? Wait…wrong question. We definitely have. Allow me to rephrase…

So…have they finally seen enough?

Of course the “they” in the revised question refers to Milwaukee Brewer Manager Ken Macha and General Manager Doug Melvin. And whatever might I be talking about when I ask if enough of it has been seen?

That’s a simple answer as well.

Jorge Julio.

Julio almost single-armedly threw the Milwaukee Brewers from a series-opening (and road trip-beginning) victory into a loss. Between walks, hitting a couple of batters and general ineffectiveness all the way around, Julio was ultimately charged with four earned runs without recording a single out.It skyrocketed his ERA from 5.71 (still poor by itself, don’t get me wrong) to 7.79.

Now, to be fair, over his last four outings, Julio had put together 5.2 innings of scoreless ball. This was is mostly low pressure situations. Monday night should have been another low pressure spot again, just bridging the gap between Jeff Suppan who Houdini’d his way around trouble for the most part but did so by racking up 100 pitches in just 5 innings. All Julio was charged with was pitching through the 6th so that Coffey, Villanueva and (if necessary) Trevor Hoffman could take the game over and close the door.

But what did Julio accomplish? He loaded the bases, pushed a run across whether the Marlins wanted it or not, and finally gave way to Coffey who couldn’t stop the bleeding and actually allowed a run of his own in the inning as well. But with a a four run lead, facing the bottom of the order…you just can’t do what Julio did tonight and expect to stick in the big leagues very long.

I’ll admit that after seeing the numbers Julio put up in Atlanta at the end of last season, I was optimistic when the Brewers signed him in the off-season.

After a rough spring, Julio surprised everyone by making the 25-man roster when the team headed north to San Francisco for the opening series of the 2009 regular season. That could be as much of a matter of timing that he’s stuck with the team as long as he has. Julio made the team in the first place primarily because Hoffman was injured so there was an opening. When Hoffman was ready to come back, David Riske needed time on the DL (from which he’s still rehabbing). Even now, when the rumors are that the Brewers will be calling up someone from the minors to help the bullpen out, there’s talk that Mark DiFelice might have to go on the DL due to some elbow inflammation.

But truly, I don’t see how the stars continue to align to allow Julio to ply his trade at the Major League level. Maybe it’s because he does have a live arm and can throw very hard. Maybe it’s because every now and then he comes out and has a few appearances in a row where he doesn’t allow any runs to score.

Therein lies the problem, however, is because you just don’t know who is coming to the mound from the bullpen on a given night despite Ken Macha having Bill Castro call Stan Kyles with the exact same name.

Julio’s earned runs allowed over his last 10 appearances? 0, 0, 1, 0, 4, 0, 0, 0, 0, 4. How can a manager be expected to trust that arm?

So, to quote some lyrics from the song that the Miller Park audio crew has been using for when Jorge Julio is summoned from the bullpen:

“Well, I’m on my way
I don’t know where I’m going
but I’m on my way
I’m takin my time but I don’t know where”

Allow me to respond to those lines the way Doug Melvin should have tonight after the game in Miami…

You’re going to the waiver wire because you’ve been designated for assignment. Oh, and as for taking your time? Don’t bother. Get to steppin’.

(I mean seriously…could you see Doug Melvin say “Get to steppin'”? That’d be hilarious.)

One For Their Last One

By: Big Rygg

For all of the talk about the last several games played at Citizens Bank Ballpark by the Milwaukeee Brewers, things have changed..

No longer have the Brewers lost their last seven games in a row in Philadelphia (including playoffs). No longer is the last Brewer win in the city of brotherly love May 17, 2007. No longer have we only one won game in our last 11 at Philadelphia.

The script, as they say, has flipped.

Could this be related to the comments Ryan Braun made to the media after yesterday’s mess of a game? Perhaps. More likely, though, it was directly related to the change that Manager Ken Macha made by flip-flopping J.J. Hardy and Mike Cameron in the lineup. Cameron has been red hot and came through with a two-RBI hit that pushed our lead to 3-0 at the time. Hardy also had a pair of hits (including a solo home run) and was on base three times. Necessary move by Macha and very nice that he actually made that move. Does anyone reading this honestly believe that move gets made last year?

A few notes on the pitching from this one:

First, good start by Braden Looper. 107 pitches, 6.0 IP, 5 H, 2 BB, 0 R. It would have been very nice to see him get into the 7th inning. But the guy did his work in this one. The biggest gripe is that with no strikeouts and no runs scoring, you’d think 107 pitches would get you a bit deeper.

Second, the bullpen picked up Looper for his second win of the season by twirling 3 innings of relief. Mark DiFelice still carries a 0.00 ERA, Carlos Villanueva actually held a team scoreless in an appearance (despite falling behind hitters again) and although Todd Coffey made it interesting in the 9th, he still recorded his second save in as many appearances by working the 9th inning (including a strike out of Ryan Howard).

The downstream affects of this game?

First, we have the chance to win a series. Albeit a small chance if Cole Hamels remembers how to pitch by tomorrow afternoon, but a chance. You can’t win three-game series with a win in game 3 if you lose games 1 & 2. That math doesn’t work.

Second, it appears that we’ve found our 8th inning guy once Hoffman returns from the disabled list. Coffey is getting it done by using a simple philosophy: Make them hit the ball to beat you.

Third, shutouts breed confidence. Granted, we did give up the one run in the 9th, but the shutouts I’m talking about are Looper’s, DiFelice’s and (most importantly) Villanueva’s. Great news for those guys, especially against the offensive lineup of this Philly team.

So, we move on to tomorrow. Dave Bush is on the bump against Hamels.

…with a chance at a series victory.

Yes, baby steps, but steps in the right direction for a change!